'Totally disrespectful': Workers allege MnDOT neglect led to poor air quality

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DULUTH — Along the St. Louis River not far from the site of the 1826 Fond du Lac Treaty signing, a group of Native Americans spent months sifting masses of...

Members of the burial recovery crew, most of whom are descendants of the Fond du Lac indigenous people, use soil sifters to look for bones and other artifacts at the MnDOT project site on Highway 23 in Duluth's Fond du Lac neighborhood on a recent morning. Bob King / Forum News Service
This is the MnDOT building where burial crew members screened dirt from the gravesite on Highway 23 in Fond du Lac looking for bones and other cultural artifacts. Bob King / Forum News Service
Crew member Kate Ratkovich is making charcoal drawings of all the items recovered from the burial ground to include in a permanent archive. Bob King / Forum News Service
Matthew Northrup, who worked on the burial recovery project, described the symptoms he experienced while working inside a MnDOT building this past winter. Bob King / Forum News Service
Lisa Lawrence-Northrup, a member of the burial recovery crew, describes the symptoms she experienced while working inside the prefabricated building sifting for bones and artifacts this past winter. Bob King / Forum News Service
Members of the burial recovery crew examine a possible artifact during digging and sifting on a recent June morning. Bob King / Forum News Service
A member of the burial recovery crew uses a shaker box to sift for bones and other artifacts at Fond du Lac indigenous people's gravesite on Highway 23 in Duluth's Fond du Lac neighborhood last month. Bob King / Forum News Service

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